Sky News reports that two commissions are currently investigating the idea of ceasing to refer to God as “He,” “Him,” and “Our Father” in a new collaborative endeavour.

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According to the news source, the decision was made in response to a query made at the synod by Rev. Joanna Stobart, vicar of Ilminster and Whitelackington in Somerset.

In order to portray the creator in a “non-gendered way,” the man of God wants a “more inclusive language” to be used when referring to God in Church of England ceremonies.

In the past 20 years, there has been a higher interest in learning other languages, a representative for the Church of England told Sky News.

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He however added that there were no plans to “abolish or substantially revise currently authorised liturgies”.

“Christians have recognised since ancient times that God is neither male nor female, yet the variety of ways of addressing and describing God found in scripture has not always been reflected in our worship.

“As part of its regular programme of work for the next five years, the Liturgical Commission has asked the faith and order commission to work with it on looking at these questions.

“No such changes could be made without extensive legislation,” the spokesman said, as quoted by sky news.

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One person who would love to see God referred to in gender-neutral terms is Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, who stated back in 2008 that “God is not male or female. God is not definable”.

The project will start this spring, according to Bishop of Lichfield and vice head of the Liturgical Commission, Rev Dr Michael Ipgrave.

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According to sources, the Liturgical Commission will collaborate on the initiative for the next five years with the Faith and Order Commission, another Church of England body that provides theological guidance.

People’s opinions to the project have already been mixed, with many claiming that it is needless.

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